Sexual Harassment

St. Paul Sexual Harassment Lawyer

Sexually Harassed in the Workplace?

As an employee in the United States of America, you are protected by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) from unlawful and unwelcome sexual harassment while at work. If you believe that you have been harassed in a sexual manner, or harassed in a way that pertains to your sex, you must be willing to stand up for your rights and pursue a legal conclusion that ends the harassment and offers you any necessary compensation for the wrongdoing. Our St. Paul employment law lawyer from Capitol City Law Group can represent you in your complaint or subsequent legal case, from start to finish, conference room to courtroom.


Call (651) 419-3615 for a free consultation to discuss the validity of your sexual harassment claim.


Sexual Harassment Claims FAQ

  1. What behavior constitutes sexual harassment?
    Unwelcome sexual advances, requests or bargaining for sexual activities, inappropriate physical touching or grouping, and verbal abuse of a sexual nature can all be considered sexual harassment. The key is that the work environment becomes hostile, uncomfortable, or biased.
  2. Who can be considered a harasser in a sexual harassment claim?
    Anyone who you come into contact with while at work can be considered a sexual harasser if their conduct constitutes it. This can be your boss, any manager within the company, a coworker, a third-party supplier who works with your business, or even a customer or client.
  3. Does sexual harassment have to be sexual in nature?
    Not necessarily. Verbal abuse or derogatory comments that targets a person’s sex are under the umbrella of sexual harassment at the workplace. For example, if someone made a joke that was clearly meant to be insulting to all women, it would be sexual harassment.
  4. Does a harasser have to be of a different sex than the victim for it to be sexual harassment?
    No. Anyone of any sex can sexually harass anyone else of any sex. Many sexual harassment cases can be linked to a male employees bothering other male employees, often insulting their masculinity or sexual orientation.
  5. Are teasing or exploratory comments acceptable?
    EEOC regulations prohibit severe and openly offensive forms of sexual harassment but it also does not permit persistent teasing or unwelcome comments or questions, as even innocuous gestures or comments can eventually compile to create an offensive or hostile work environment.
  6. Do I have to be at work to be sexually harassed by a coworker?
    No. Inappropriate behavior from a coworker outside of work may constitute sexual harassment, especially if they know that their actions are unwelcome, or do so in a way that involves the workplace.

Employers Must Attempt to Stop Sexual Harassment

Companies with more than 15 employees are expected by the EEOC’s regulations to do all they can to prevent and stop any form of sexual harassment in their workplace. They can utilize training seminars, write-ups, demotions, and even firings to relay to the harasser that their behavior is unacceptable.

If no corrective measures are taken to stop sexual harassment as soon as it is reported to management or the company owner’s, the employer can be held liable and sued for compensatory damages, such as those that will cover pain and anguish caused by the harassment.

In some situations, the harasser is the direct supervisor of the harassed. It can be difficult, intimidating, or impossible to speak up to report the harassment. In such situations, it is important to contact the EEOC directly and retain an employment law attorney as soon as possible. When the harasser is notified of your report, they may attempt to penalize you unfairly, and you will want your lawyer present to protect your rights.


Set up a free consultation with our St. Paul employment lawyers today. We are committing to defending your rights as an American worker!


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